The Truth about Escargot

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    What is escargot?

    Escargot. What are the words that come to your mind when I throw that word out there?  Free association… 

    Snails, fancy, French, expensive, slimy, gross, delicious, Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman “slippery little suckers,” anything else?  Well, in some ways, nearly all of these can be true, but not all the time.

    Escargot aren't nearly as difficult to make at home as you might think. Here are a few tips on how to make escargot! #escargot #howtomakeescargot www.savoryexperiments.com

    Escargot aren’t nearly as difficult to make at home as you might think. Here are a few tips on how to make escargot!

    It is TRUE that escargot are indeed land snails, which for some odd reason turns people off from the get-go.

    Make sure you PIN All About Escargot before you leave! 

    A snail is a mollusk and therefore hails from the same family as scallops, clams, mussels, oysters and technically octopuses and squid, even though they don’t have the shell we think of with the rest of these sea creatures. It also goes to say that snails like water and humidity, but are land dwellers.

    Which reminds me of a story of me at a young age. I was visiting my grandmother in the Bay area of California and after a light rain, her front steps were covered in snails.

    Escargot aren't nearly as difficult to make at home as you might think. Here are a few tips on how to make escargot! #escargot #howtomakeescargot www.savoryexperiments.com

    At that age, I thought they would die without water, so I heroically transferred every snail I could find from the front of her home to the powder room sink. I few hours later someone accidentally checked on my little friends and, well, you can imagine what happened then.

    Let’s just say they escaped from my warm water bath. Oops. She, nor my parents were very pleased with the goo covered bathroom. 

    Let’s continue with a few more myths, first being that they are expensive. At fancy restaurants, yes.

    Five snails, swimming in butter, garlic and parsley will run you about $15+.  Hold on, because I am about to blow your mind: a can of giant escargot, 12 count, only costs $8. *Wait*  Did you say CAN??? Escargot recipes can be affordable when made at home! 

    Escargots a la Bourguignonne (Escargot with Herbed Butter)

    Why, yes, I did. Most escargot don’t come packaged like the rest of our mollusk friends. Have you ever seen them in the seafood case?

    The reason being that they are extremely challenging and time consuming to remove from their shells. The entire in-shell process includes rinsing them several times and allowing “clean” substances, such as dill, to run through their systems to remove any debris or dirt.

    Tools for making escargot: 

    Escargot Shells– If you are buying canned escargot and want the pretty presentation of a shell, you’ll also need to buy the shells. Make sure you buy the correct size that coordinate to the size of escargot you purchased. 

    Escargot– I’m guessing you’ll need the actual escargot as well. 

    Escargot Dish– Serving dishes vary in size and depth. If you place to cook them with puff pastry or just with garlic butter will depend on the type of dish you require. 

    Seafood Forks– If you are serving them in a shell, then you’ll want to make sure they have a fork, too. And the little tongs! 

    This is followed by a quick hot bath (much like preparing crabs or lobster) before finally prying from the shell and removing the hepatho-pancreas (digestive glands).

    Therefore, the majority of your restaurants will be purchasing the beloved appetizer in a can too, which is a 71% markup.  How do they get away with it?

    Consumers perceive the preparation of escargot recipes to be difficult and time consuming and the truth is, it is neither of those things (if you let someone else do the cleaning and removal).

    Escargot Vol-Au-Vent (Escargot in puff pastry)

    So here are some pointers on how to cook escargot:

    ONE. Like many other protein sources, the flavor and texture will vary from species to species.  The most popular edible snail is the helix, which comes in a variety of sizes, similar to shrimp: large, extra large and jumbo/giant.

    TWO. Escargot many have fancy names, but are simple concepts:  Escargot Vol-Au-Vent (Escargot in Puff Pastry) and Escargots a la Bourguignonne (Escargot with Herbed Butter) aren’t really that intimidating after you translate them.

    THREE. Escargot do not have to be served in-shell.  You can prepare Escargot Buns, Escargot Vol-Au-Vent or Pesto and Tomato Escargot.

    FOUR. Because they are packaged in a can and without a shell, you can purchase your empty shells separately.  Rinse them well before using and know that if washed well again (I boil mine), they can be reused.

    FIVE. Most of the preparation can be done ahead of time and since snails come pre-cooked, they only take a few minutes in the oven before they are ready to eat!

    Escargot aren't nearly as difficult to make at home as you might think. Here are a few tips on how to make escargot! #escargot #howtomakeescargot www.savoryexperiments.com

    Here are a few more questions you might have about how to make escargot: 

    Are escargot healthy? This is always a tough questions and I am not a registered dietician nor a doctor. Please consult your physician.

    However, escargot typically have about 75 calories and 1 gram of fat per 3 ounce serving. Each snail is about 1 ounce. This does NOT include the delicious butter or puff pastry you are about to cover them in. 

    Can escargot be frozen? Raw escargot can be frozen if packaged properly. They will last in the freezer for up to 4 months. 

    Can escargot be eaten raw? In some countries, such as France and Turkey, raw escargot are considered a delicacy and eaten crudo style like scallops, which are also a mollusk. However, in the states, escargot are typically cooked, which is a safer preparation method especially if they are coming from a can. 

    Can pescatarians eat escargot? Escargot are seafood, so presumably, yes. That doesn’t mean that every pescartarian will eat them, however. Just like every carnivore doesn’t eat beef or chicken. 

    Are escargot vegetarian? Escargot are seafood, so unless someone is a pescatarian, no they would not eat escargot. 

    Can you reuse escargot shells? Yes! Part of the beauty of making escargot at home is to reuse the shells. Wash them out really good. Let them soak and make sure they are very dry before you store them. Escargot shells are not dishwasher safe. 

    Can escargot be reheated? They can, but like most seafood, reheating results in a rubbery texture. 

    So…. are you read to prepare your own escargot at home?? 

    Escargot aren't nearly as difficult to make at home as you might think. Here are a few tips on how to make escargot! #escargot #howtomakeescargot www.savoryexperiments.com

     

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